Live Review: Leeds Festival 2015 – 28/08/2015 – 30/08/2015

Friday August 28th

After weeks and months of prepartion, Leeds Festival begins and with a plethora of acts from all corners of the music world, it’s difficult to know where to start. However for us we knew we had to start on the main stage. Having left a lasting impression on the NME/BBC Radio One stage twelve months ago, Lonely The Brave’s jump to the main stage has mixed results. Stylistically their perfect for this stage; big, anthemic songs with instrumentation to match. However the always reserved David Jakes hinders their set by hovering away from the front of the crowd leaving guitarist Mark Trotter to get involved with their dedicated following. Nonetheless Jakes pulls in once again an almighty performance that makes for his lack charisma. They deserve a spot on the main stage and have the songs to fill the space but it may not be enough for Lonely The Brave to get higher up the bill in the future. (3.5/5) (SR)

Against Me!’s run of smashing out quality UK performances continued with their slot on the main stage. Laura Jane Grace revelled in the scale of her surroundings visibly having the time of her life, a sizeable crowd lapping up every snarl and swagger. Singalongs to the likes of ‘Fuck My Life 666’ and ‘Black Me Out’ showed that plenty present had absorbed the band’s newest album ‘Transgender Dysphoria Blues’ in its entirety. Although the set defining moment still came from a towering performance of ‘I Was A Teenage Anarchist’. AM looked every bit as at home here as they do in a grungy club show, an energetic performance from bassist Inge and the size and strength of their frontwoman’s forceful personality effortlessly filling the space. (4/5) (DW)

To say The Gaslight Anthem’s set on the main stage was surely their last in northern England for quite some time, there no big goodbyes or displays of sentiment here. This was a tight and business like affair that gave nods to most of the New Jersey native’s stellar back catalogue. There’s a slight but nonetheless noticeable wilt in enthusiasm for some of the newer songs, but when Fallon and co hit full flow on ‘The ’59 Sound’, ‘Biloxi Parish’ and closer ‘The Backseat’ it makes for undeniably excellent fare. As much as it’s sad to see Gaslight take time away, if it sees them rediscover their songwriting form of four or five years ago it’ll be more then worth it. (4.5/5) (DW)


Photos by Carrie-Anne Pollard. View more photos here.

Back home in the UK after spending two months on the Vans Warped Tour, Moose Blood are welcomed back to a rapturous reception. From the start Eddie Brewerton looks overwhelmed as the crowd sing back the bands emo rock anthems. The quartet show no shines of fatigue as tracks like ‘I Hope You’re Missing Me’ and ‘Gum’ have an extra spring making them feel at home at such a festival. The wave of momentum Moose Blood have been riding in recent months doesn’t look like it will end anytime soon, and todays showing is merely a celebration of how far they’ve come so far. (4/5) (SR)


Photos by Jade Till. View more photos here.

Scrappy, chaotic and perfect. Just three words that describe Beartooth’s Leeds Festival debut. Caleb Shomo’s screams roar through The Pit stage whilst his band mates rip through with their brand of metalcore. The tent itself instantly turned tornado of circling bodies. Whilst as not as ravenous as their showing at Download, songs such as ‘Beaten In Lips’ and ‘In Between’ still have plenty of bite. Their overall presentation has velocity that releases everyone in attendance from their troubles and unifies them. The rise of Beartooth continues. (3.5/5) (SR)


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Festival season has basically seen AH follow Bury Tomorrow about the country like none too subtle stalker. Although their time on The Pit stage may not have quite matched the stage invasion level of 2000 Trees, this was still the brothers Winter-Bates in the best form we’ve seen them in this year. A willing and rowdy crowd obeyed every barker and snarled command much to the pair’s obvious satisfaction. The festival’s most enclosed stage served only to intensify the impact of a set list bossed by ‘Crown Of Thorns’, ‘Of Glory’ and ‘Lionheart’ as they crush and uplift in equal measure. (4/5) (DW)


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Largely on the strength of his name and past endeavours Frank Iero and his new outfit Frnkiero and the cellabration were able to attract a more then respectable scrum into the Pit tent. There’s enough of an air of controlled chaos about Iero’s presence and bearing to make him a plenty watchable frontman, while the band he’s assembled clearly have plenty of live chops. There’s a jangling airiness to ‘She’s The Prettiest Girl at The Party…’ that adds the merest hint of accessibility to the otherwise raw and rough around the edge grunge-punk whole. The playfully anarchic ‘Joyriding’ provided a set highlight as did the similarly raucous ‘Neverenders’. (3/5) (DW)


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In recent years We Are The Ocean have evolved from their post-hardcore roots to a smooth alt rock band with ease. Whilst latest album ‘Ark’ may have seen them explore a more accessible route, their set on the Festival Republic stage is impressive. Delivered with passion and confidence, WATO seem at home showcasing their mix of soaring chorus, warm riffs and soulful melodies. (3/5) (SR)


Photos by Carrie-Anne Pollard. View more photos here.

Having been tucked away on the mammoth line-up poster, Manchester Orchestra’s six song set on the Festival Republic stage was never going to be long enough to satisfy our needs. With a discography built on thunderous, powerful and emotive songs, their 30 minute showcase was short yet stunning. Frontman Andy Hull’s unique voice is compelling and has you hooked on every last word, whilst his band mates compliment with a tight, robust sound that effortlessly defines their heavy and soft moments. By the moment time is called on their set, we’re left helplessly wanting more. (4/5) (SR)


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Frank Turner holds the record for most consecutive R&L appearances, a fact which he’s rightfully proud of, and one that explains why he was able to plan and pull off as exquisitely a judged and received headline set as it’s possible to see on the Festival Republic stage. Frank’s solo sets are rare enough now that this was always going to be a memorable one, but add a tangible sense of communal goodwill and unabashed joy in the packed tent alongside a set list that most fans would have hand-picked and you’ll start to get an idea of just how special it was. Hell we even got ‘The Ballad of Me and My Friends’ and airings of that are rocking horse shit rare. Later a poignant and reverentially received performance of ‘A Song For Josh’ from new album ‘Positive Songs For Negative People’ left a lump in every throat in the vicinity. Proceedings built gloriously to the crescendo of ‘Photosynthesis’ and ‘I Still Believe’ that saw levels of singing and dancing reach nigh on deliriously happy. That only left Frank’s unique take on Queen classic ‘Somebody To Love’ to bring day one on the stage to a fitting close. (5/5) (DW)


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As we’ve all known for awhile now – Refused aren’t fucking dead. And on tonight’s showing, they’re far from it. Older numbers like ‘Rather Be Dead’ are viscous whilst newer cuts (‘War on the Palaces’ and ‘Thought Is Blood’) have edge and swagger. Oh and they throw in a bit of Slayer that is complimented by Dennis Lyxzén’s peculiar dancing. Nevertheless he’s a natural frontman; energetic and raw. Closing with rock club night favourite ‘New Noise’, the concise set is an impressice snapshot of Refused’s career and their growth; part destructive post-hardcore and part experimental art rock. (3.5/5) (SR)

Saturday August 29th


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The action got underway on the Lock Up Stage with a real feel good moment as local lads Calls Landing achieved their childhood dreams of playing Leeds Fest. Cheered on by plenty of friends and peers from the Leeds scene the five piece did themselves proud with their infectious brand of poppy emo rock proving a cracking shout to open the stage. The band gave a great advert for their excellent debut album ’Heirlooms as ’Golden’, ’Crutch’ and ’Patrick’ all sounded well suited to the festival environment. Hopefully this will be the catalyst to even bigger and better things for the band.(4/5) (DW)

Having made the jump from the Lock Up to the Main Stage, there is a subtle sense of excitement as Neck Deep hit the big stage. Whilst similar bands have struggled with the early afternoon slot, the Wrexham group once again show their worth with a set of bold, feel-good pop punk songs. Although helped along by a strong dedicated following you get the feeling some in attendance continue to be sceptical. As they chug along with a mix of old and new songs, it is clear that Neck Deep have good but not great set of pop-punk songs in their arsenal. Their are still some loose ends that need tightening up. Whilst their latest LP, ‘Life’s Not Out To Get You’, isn’t showcased strong enough with just the two singles being rolled out alongside old favourites. However the enhanced version of ‘Part of Me’ comes off well and is bittersweet with vocalist Laura Whiteside making a cameo. Although not one of the most memorable sets of the weekend, it’s still an admirable achievement for all those in the UK pop punk scene and especially Neck Deep. (3/5) (SR)

Whilst on record The Bots come off as cool hipster garage punks, today they seem more genuine even if you can’t hear Mikaiah Lei vocals. Nevertheless they have style nailed down. Blues-y indie punk that reminds us of Kasabian is what they have to offer. However their style lacks energy, something that should be required with any band in the Lock Up tent. It’s unfortunately not enough to grab our attention for long enough as we looked at what else the festival had to offer. (2/5) (SR)


Photos by Carrie-Anne Pollard. View more photos here.

Over at the NME/Radio One tent, emo stalwarts American Football provide us some melancholy, soothing sounds. Although they’re not the biggest draw of the weekend, the quartet prove to mesmerising with their soft emo sound. Throughout they deliver a delicate that is simply pleasing on the ear. With intertwining guitars, breezy percussion and the occasional sweet brass section, American Football sent us into a comforting lull that gave us a reminder of their impact and influence. (4/5) (SR)

Due to the rather irksome nature of the Saturday set scheduling AH doesn’t get to spend anywhere near as long in the company of Eliza and The Bear as we would have liked. But the time we do get is as thoroughly enjoyable as anything else all weekend. Wisely the Londoners open with ’Friends’, a track featured on a cider ad over the summer, and one that unsurprisingly quickly has people streaming into the Festival Republic tent. With this and ’Lionsheart’ showing off EATB’s immaculate melodies and harmonies to dazzling effect it took the prospect of something really exciting to drag us away.(3.5/5) (DW)


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That exciting prospect was a rare UK appearance by Panic! At The Disco. And judging by the crowd which was genuinely huge for that point in the afternoon, we were far from the only ones looking forward to it. In truth this was Panic in name only with only Brendan Urie present from the original lineup, not that anyone seemed to care. Urie was the consummate showman bounding and jigging his was gleefully about the main stage looking cool as hell in the process as his sparkly blazer and golden mic gleemed in the brief interludes of Yorkshire sunshine. This was a Panic resolutely focused on the present with ’Dance Tonight, ’Nine In the Afternoon’ and ’Mona Lisa’ giving cursory nods to the band’s first few albums. It was the covers and the new material that were the stars of this show. ’Hallelujah’ and ’This Is Gospel’ both sounding vibrant and delightfully theatrical. This was just a prelude to Urie really strutting his stuff on an exceptionally pulled off series of covers, nailing ’Bohemian Rhapsody’ like it was the greatest song he wishes he wrote. Later a medley of ’Any Way You Want It’ and ’You Shook Me All Night Long’ put huge smiles on thousands of faces before the band’s biggest hit ’I Write Sins Not Tragedies’ brought Leeds 2015’s most fun set to a close.(4/5) (DW)


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If All Time Low’s main stage set proved anything it’s love them or hate them, you can’t failed to be entertained by them. The boys from Baltimore have basically become the band that Blink 182 realised years ago they can’t be arsed to be anymore and they gave a performance that was fittingly puerile but hilarious stage banter and flawlessly polished pop-punk all the way. Even if one point Alex Gasgarth dropped a massive glanger with his pre-rehearsed quips exclaiming ”You guys are much crazier then Leeds” to many, many boos. This faux pas aside ATL has no issues making the entire stage their own, reminding us that they’re far from strangers to setting of this scale these days. Jack Barakit appeared on a mission to cover every inch of Bramham, variously sprinting about the stage pretending to ride a sweeping brush like a broomstick, wandering the photo pit with his guitar and clambering all over the amp stacks. Tracks from new album ’Future Hearts’ nestled happily in the setlist alongside older hits, showing if anything Gaskarth’s writing only continues to get stronger. Early positions in said list for ’Lost In Stereo’ and ’Weightless’ meant the band had the main stage rocking from the get go, while penultimate number ’Something’s Gotta Give’ received a decent singalong before ’Dear Maria’ ended things with a bang.(4/5) (DW)


Photos by Carrie-Anne Pollard. View more photos here.

Having a dropped in the UK album chart earlier this month, Don Broco are riding a wave of momentum right now. Playing to a packed out NME/Radio One tent, they deliver an arsenal of festival-ready hooks that simply make you feel good. Cuts from their recent ‘Automatic’ are carried with a mix of funk and straight-up rock. Their style is truly infectious. Whilst Rob D comes as charismatic and charming. Older tracks balance out the more recent ones with an pulsating alt rock edge. This short eight song showing doesn’t quite fill our fix of Broco’s infectious pop-rock. If anything it’s proved they’re more than a hyped band and justify their position as one of the UK’s most commercially successful rock bands in recent years. (3.5/5) (SR)

Every now and then it’s possible to strike it lucky at a festival and be completely blown away by a set watched on a whim. Enter Scottish trio Prides who were our surprise package of the weekend. Their huge anthemic take on electronic indie pop proving to be sharp, energising and impossible to ignore. ’Higher Love’, ’Little Danger’ and closer ’Messiah’ all kept our attention glued to the Festival Republic Stage, even if their sound is a bit of departure from the bands usually featured on our pages. It’s not hard to see why Prides have been so hotly tipped by the likes of compatriots Twin Atlantic. (3.5/5) (DW)

After they made our cut of must see bands for the festival we had high hopes for God Damn. Sadly their stint on the Lock Up Stage was a rather hit and miss affair. The pair certainly churn out plenty of racket and were packing riffs galore, but they seemed to be lacking some of the finesse and depth they possess on record. The wall of sound barrelling out from the stage left those not already devotees to the cause looking distinctly non-plussed. Nonetheless there was just enough to like about this scuzzy heavy rock duo. (2.5/5) (DW)


hotos by Jade Till. View more photos here.

Having delivered two of the most beloved punk rock records in recent years, The Menzingers’ set on the Lock Up stage served to be merely a snapshot of their Americana-infused goodness. With a mix of favourites from ‘On the Impossible Past’ and ‘Rented World’, the Philadelphia group produce an overwhelming set that left us with a beaming smile and our fist firmly in the air. Songs like ‘Good Things’, ‘I Don’t Wanna Be An Asshole Anymore’ and ‘In Remission’ are sung back in glorious unison. With the ‘Rented World’ album cycle heading to the finish line, this was nearly a perfect short visit from The Menzingers. (4.5/5) (SR)


Photos by Carrie-Anne Pollard. View more photos here.

It takes a song or two for the small gathering to get into what Modern Life Is War have on offer. Their brand of abrasive hardcore is delivered with force. As they thrash their way through with social and political zest, their message is truthful even 10 years from the release of ‘Witness’. Musically chugging, sharp guitars and pounding drums dominate as Jeffrey Eaton blares out each visceral word. Whilst many are like statues you get the feeling MLIW’s defiant message is well and truly received. It is no doubt that the Iowa captured the true essence of hardcore on the Lock Up stage. (3/5) (SR)


Photos by Carrie-Anne Pollard. View more photos here.

It is kind of ironic that Limp Bizkit are headlining the NME/Radio One stage tonight. Both organisations have took the higher ground with Fred Durst and company in recent years. However here we are in 2015 and on tonights evidence Limp Bizkit are the biggest party band in the world. From start to finish, the Jacksonville deliver an exhilarating show packed with hits to a tent that is bursting at the seems. Their routine is fairly simple; turn up, play all the hits and make sure everyone is having a good time. Sure there’s a hint of novelty but that is firmly lost amongst the chunky riffs, crisp beats, scratchy turntable noises and the charismatic Fred Durst – the ceremonial party host. (4.5/5) (SR)


Photos by Jade Till. View more photos here.

For such a prominent spot as penultimate band on the Lock Up Stage veteran Canadian pop punkers Simple Plan’s set seemed to flash by in the blink of an eye. It’s been a while since we’ve seen the band do much in the way of international touring, but Pierre Bouvier and his mob haven’t missed a step. They put in a well-oiled performance that was smashed out of the park without even seeming to really break a sweat. Even though much of the set was taken from most recent album ’Get Your Heart On’ every track drew decent participation from the crowded and lively tent. ’Can’t Keep My Hands Off You’ and ’Loser Of The Year’ were both unashamedly good fun, but new single ’Boom’ comes off as cheesy bordering on the cringe worthy. Hearing dudes in their mid-thirties belting out the teenage angst of ’Welcome To My Life’ is a little odd though still a bouncy trip down memory lane. And in fairness the track choices could definitely have benefited from a few more of the hits.(3/5) (DW)


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Whilst Simple Plan may have not made use of pulling out the hits, New Found Glory don’t make the same mistake. Whilst recent efforts have had mixed results, tonights headline set on the Lock Up stage is a reminder of why NFG are so beloved. By delivering wall to wall pop punk “bangers”, the quartet celebrate their career in style. Tonight you can’t argue they have the art of producing stellar pop punk tunes down to a tee. Even new cuts like ‘Selfless’ and ‘Vicious Love’ feel at home alongside classics such as ‘All Downhill from Here’, ‘Something I Call Personality’, and ‘Hit or Miss’. Inevitably closing with ‘My Friends Over You’, we’re left walking away with our pop punk fix well and truly filled. (4.5/5) (SR)

Sunday August 30th


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Without a doubt Baby Metal draw the biggest crowd out of all the opening main stage bands all weekend and it seems most are here out of pure scepticism. The combination of thrash metal and J-pop is certainly a spectacle to be seen. You can’t fault the trio’s backing band as they’re one of tightest and fiercest bands you’ll hear all weekend. However their musical prowess is distracted by the trio’s high-pitched vocals. Whilst they have proved they can pull in a strong festival crowd for a short 30 minute set, can they do it by themselves at Wembley Arena in April? As sceptical as we may be, they might jsut do it. (3.5/5) (SR)


Photos by Carrie-Anne Pollard. View more photos here.

After a very impressive showing at Download, The One Hundred pull in a strong crowd as they showcase their energetic brand of rap-infused rock. With every outing, the London quartet seem to get better and better. Tracks like ‘Breed’ and ‘Tale Of Two Cities’ have the right balance of chaotic rock and party-ready electronics that easily wins the crowd over. Whilst its closing number ‘Downfall’ that is the stand out with its vibrant, infectious chorus. If they continue to produce tracks like that, then The One Hundred could go far. (3.5/5) (SR)


Photos by Jade Till. View more photos here.

Having worked their way up the line-up in recent years, today is a homecoming/celebration for local heroes Marmozets. With an award winning album on their CV, their main stage spot sees them pick out the best moments from it. ‘Captivate You’ has become more atmospheric, ‘Particle’ is more ferocious whilst ‘Born Young and Free’ continues to as fierce as ever. However there are times where the band seem to be in a routine rather than in a celebratory mood. (3/5) (SR)

It’s fortunate that clashes exist because you can imagine the majority of the people watching Marmozets would of discovered a new favourite band in Black Peaks. Having played a handful of noticeable festivals in recent months, we still can’t get enough of Black Peaks and their dynamic brand of hard rock. Will Gardner’s vocals are powerful whilst his band mates provide an onslaught of thick riffs and dense bass lines. Having recently inked a deal with Sony Music/Easy Life Records, and a tour with Lonely The Brave penciled in for later this year, it is only a matter of time before Black Peaks become a big deal. (3.5/5) (SR)


Photos by Carrie-Anne Pollard. View more photos here.

At Leeds 2014, AH had its attention firmly grabbed by Slaves rocking a Pit Stage that was, if we’re honest, modestly full at best. Still we were suitably impressed and tipped them for bigger things in the future. Twelve months and ringing endorsements from Radio One and NME later we’re proved correct as the pair seriously pack out the vast Radio One/ NME tent. Happily success has dampened neither the punk spirit that oozes from them or their irreverent humour and stage banter. The spirit of the Sex Pistols runs strong in Slaves and their wonderfully mental and unrefined garage-punk and it’s awesome to see them given the chance to shine in such spacious surroundings. The sight and sound of the thousands in the tent bellowing ’The Hunter’ back at the stage was one that will stick in the memory for a while. A main stage slot for these two really isn’t out of the question in the near future. (4/5) (DW)


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In the past both of No Devotion’s previous bands have played bigger stages here. However this is a new chapter for all involved so a mid-afternoon slot on The Pit stage sounds ideal. Whilst on record their sound is more synth-heavy, today they come as a more atmospheric rock band. Not that we’re complaining. Geoff Rickley is a seasoned frontman and it shows. Songs like ’Addition’ and ‘10000 Summers’ are punchy and are complimented by a powerful, soaring chorus. The negatives come in the (very) minor technical feedback and Rickley’s tendency muddle his way through the bands more calmer moments. Nevertheless they serve their purpose well and our anticipation for their debut album next month continues to grow. (4/5) (SR)


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As It Is’ touring schedule seems to be never ending. Just two weeks after a mixed showing at Hevy Fest, their Leeds Fest debut shows improvement. Perhaps playing in an enclosed setting simply works better for the Brighton group? Their vocals are less patchy then they have been previous showings. Whilst their youthful pop-punk energy is still firmly in tact they’re seemingly not the biggest pull in The Pit tent. (3/5) (SR)


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A rare visit to the BBC Introducing stage sees us being welcomed by Norwich folk punks Ducking Punches. The quintet pull a decent size crowd as they showcase a range of upbeat numbers that seem fitting for a breezy Sunday afternoon. (3/5) However the pull of the returning Alexisonfire was just too much. Delivering a set packed with fan favourites, the quintet certainly satisfied our expectations and this wasn’t a band back together for an easy pay day. They genuinely looked like a band having fun playing together. They were laughing and joking and at one stage George Petit joined the masses upon a rubber dingy. Although we don’t know if this the last time we’ll see “the only band ever”, it’ll certainly be a memorable way to go out. (4.5/5) (SR)


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In the four months since their last UK visit, Pvris’ stock has continued to rise. By the time they arrive on stage (slightly late), The Pit stage is packed to the seems. Unsurprisingly there is a lot of eyes on one of 2015’s most talked about bands. Like on past showings they don’t disappoint. Front woman Lynn Gunn’s vocals are on point whilst her band mates compliment with their brand of atmospheric pop-rock. Through their dark and deeply personal lyrics they found a cathartic release that easily connects with all in the crowd. Whilst this outing was far too brief, it’s clear Pvris are destined to be playing bigger stages in the coming months and years. (3.5/5) (SR)

As one of the bigger international bands to appear on the Festival Republic stage South African alt-rockers Seether were presumably pretty disappointed by the size of the crowd that met their arrival. It did get busier but that just meant more witnesses to one of Leeds 2015’s more forgettable sets. This was the band’s very first Leeds Fest appearance, but only bassist Dale Stewart showed much enthusiasm for being their rather than their usual haunt of Download. Frontman Shaun Morgan in particular seemed out of sorts, opening his mouth only to sing and riffing haphazardly and generating feedback from his guitar almost constantly. This made the start and end of each track muddied and indistinct and got bloody annoying very quickly. Of the limited set on offer only opener ’Rise Above This’ garnered by far the best reactions and showed glimpses of what the band are really capable of. (2.5/5) (DW)


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Preluded on to stage by an amusing animated health and safety video, it was clear Bring Me The Horizon were keen to leave their mark on Leeds Festival 2015. As the female voiceover instructed the masses “to open this fucking place up” they duly obliged as the Sheffield group teared into ‘Happy Song’. Having previously conquered Wembley Arena, you get the impression that the latter along with ‘Throne’ are made for big crowds with their bold sould. Admittedly the bands performance is hindered by an obvious backing track yet simultaneously older tracks like ‘The House of Wolves’, ‘Antivist’ and ‘Blessed With a Curse’ remind us that BMTH are a metal band that continues to evolve. Closing with ‘Drown’, we’re left feeling just about convinced that they deserved their high billing but can they headline it in the future? Only time will tell. (3.5/5) (SR)

Ash provided a short but entertaining blast of nostalgia on the Festival Republic stage. The Northern Irish trio may have their most prominent days well behind them, but the lure of the hits brought plenty of bodies into the tent. Tim Wheeler and co romped cheerfully through their storied Brit rock arsenal as ’Kung Fu’ and ’Oh Yeah’ soon got heads bobbing and arms waving in recognition. A solitary new song met with utter apathy, although ’Shining Light’ and ’Girl From Mars’ got things back on track and kept the blasts from the past coming right to the end. (3.5/5) (DW)


Photos by Carrie-Anne Pollard. View more photos here.

A year ago we rather waxed lyrical about Twin Atlantic’s set midway up the bill on the Radio One/ NME stage, even going as far as suggesting they could be future headliners. This year we got just a taste of what that might be like as they ended the ‘Great Divide’ touring cycle in style second from top of the bill on the same stage. And this was a set that contained everything a future headliner would need. In short, pomp, swagger a storming set list and a whole load of streamer cannons. Oh and confetti, there was definitely plenty of confetti. To sum up how strong a track collection this was, it contained ’Free’ and ’Make A Beast Of Myself’, two of the bands biggest hits and previous closers, played back to back in the middle of the set. That Twin have spent the last year touring a near perfect album around the globe has them at the very peak of their powers and their confidence and man did it show. Sam McTrusty especially was as strong vocally and as a focal point as he’s ever been. In reality this did feel like a headline set and a great last hurrah for their current album. The masses got a moment to catch their senses as they roared out acoustic favourite ’Crash Land’, adding the needed trough of energy before the final epic spring to the peak that was ’I Am An Animal’. This lead into the whole place loosing its collective minds with joy to the one-two knockout punch finale of ’Brothers and Sisters’ and ’Heart and Soul’. Elsewhere on the site may have had aging megastars and fireworks, but in that tent we had truly incredible songs and four Scots on the precipice of superstardom. (5/5) (DW)


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In 2015 it may seem strange that an ageing thrash metal band would headline a festival as diverse as Leeds Festival. Nevertheless Metallica proved they’re still a big pull and why shouldn’t they be? They’re METALLICA! Whilst some say “once you’ve seen Metallica, you never have to see them again” may have to rethink their opinion. Joined on stage by 200 die hard fans, the metal legends ripped through classics like ‘For Whom the Bell Tolls’, ‘The Memory Remains’, ‘Sad But True’, and ‘Master of Puppets’ with virtue and force to probably, if not, the biggest crowd of the weekend. Encouraged by a massive admired crowd, the quartet fed off their energy right to the very end. Closing with ‘Enter Sandman’ and the inevitable pyro, Metallica closed Leeds Festival on a high. (4.5/5) (SR)

Overall Leeds Festival was a success. That is if you like all things rock, punk and metal. At times, the schedule was dominated by pretentious crossover acts that didn’t spark our interest, leaving occasional gaps for us to wonder and second guess why mediocre indie bands are still seemingly a big pull along with consistently questioning the Dance Stage tent addition. With that being said the mix of established acts like Metallica, Limp Bizkit and New Found Glory, potential future headliners (Bring Me The Horizon / Twin Atlantic) and several up-and-coming bands made it all worth while. It’s still one of the biggest festivals in the world, and this year once again backed up that reason.

Overall: 4/5

View more of Already Heard’s coverage from Leeds Festival 2015 here.

Words by Sean Reid (@SeanReid86) and Dane Wright (@MrDaneWright).

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