Live Review: Every Time I Die, Superheaven and Muck – Rescue Rooms, Nottingham – 09/11/2015

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When one of hardcore rock’s best live acts come to town, you’d think people will be queuing up to get in. However on this November Monday night in Nottingham, that is not the case.

By the time Muck arrive on stage, there’s a smattering of folk in the Rescue Rooms. Nevertheless, the Icelandic quartet set the tone early with a wall of feedback and bombastic hardcore blasts. Suitably scrappy from the start, Muck are ferocious in their delivery, playing at 100mph. Whilst this isn’t enough to entice the growing and appreciative crowd to get moving, there is an admirable quality to Muck; loud, dense and ideally heavy, whereas later numbers (‘Yesterday’ and ‘Dracula Blues’) hint at a more structured and melodic side. They may have not left with the convincing lasting impression, yet there is a lot to like about Muck. (3/5)

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Having released one of the most under-appreciated albums of the year, Superheaven arrive with an arsenal of 90s alt rock-infused numbers (‘Next To Nothing’ and ‘Gushing Blood’), that dwell in the verses before reluctantly exploding in the chorus while the latter is delivered with needed venom and sharp riffs. While Taylor Madison’s vocals come off as angsty and bitter, ‘Downswing’ drills away with subtle melancholic charm that thrives on the quartet’s knack for producing slacker-rock anthems. As a unit, Superheaven have a raw energy that is thorough and suits their brand of alt-rock. If anything, they’re heavier tonight than on record and that is far from a criticism. A worthy return to the UK. (4/5)

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Despite the early worries that Every Time I Die may not be the draw we thought they were, by the time the Buffalo group come on stage the venue is packed with eager fans ready to lose their sh*t. Thankfully the quintet instantly deliver with ‘Bored Stiff’ and its chugging riffs, leading to a frantic circle pit, whilst the advantage of no barrier sees a barrage of stagedivers being encouraged by Keith Buckley. Musically, their delivery is savage with the beast of a man that is Andy Williams delivering vicious riffs on what looks like a toy-sized guitar.

With tonight’s crowd being “rowdy”, a slight change in setlist sees ETID deliver some of their heaviest numbers from their growing back catalogue with ‘The New Black’ being a near-perfect example of hardcore rock ‘n’ roll. ‘Imitation Is the Sincerest Form of Battery’ and ‘We’rewolf’ pack a meaty one-two punch, whereas ‘Underwater Bimbos from Outer Space’ is simply ferocious, yet equally marvellous. From start to finish the bands and crowds energy is persistently frantic. The intensity in the venue is unrelenting to the point when ‘Moor’ brings to a momentary pause, before exploding into action with a sea of bodies flying for one final time.

Whilst tonight’s showing was only 45 minutes long, it flew by due to Every Time I Die living up to their reputation as one of hardcore’s most chaotic and fun-loving bands. Don’t ever change, ETID. (4.5/5)

4/5

Words by Sean Reid (@SeanReid86). Photos by Carrie-Anne Pollard.

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